Latest Tweets:

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Creativity needs two ingredients, in comedy especially. It needs the sort of relaxing bull shitting, left-brain throwing ideas around where 99 percent of it is a waste of time.

My formula has always been I’m big on preparing. Prepare like crazy. But then just as you’re heading out, half an hour beforehand, forget all of it. It’s there. It’s in your reptile brain. Go out but feel loose enough to grab opportunities as they come up. Don’t just stick to the plan if you see an opportunity.

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Conan O’Brien’s guide to creativity (Fast Company)

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The Rhythm of Interaction and inducing Flow in the user 

(Source: ixda.org)

"Banana Slug, arguably the toughest mascot in all of sports"

as said by Kari

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Fireworks Shortcut: Copy Style

  1. Copy the object with the style (cmd+c)
  2. Select the target object and paste the style (cmd+alt+shift+v)

Thanks for the tip Jon ヽ(´ー`)人(´∇`)/

The Language of Interaction

"language may be our v1 interface for summarizing experience"

We sell our ideas with pictures, but just as important a skill is how we use words to flesh out ideas.  The slideshow above points out that using illustrative language, such as spatial metaphors, can assist novice audiences trying to understand visual or interactive concepts.  Some examples that I’ve overheard in the workplace lately include:

  • Drawing similarities between our work & an architect’s
  • Comparing a website to walking through a museum and how in different museums either the art or the architecture are focal points
  • Borrowing the visual display of a small boutique’s storefront with scalloped awning
  • Contrasting department store shopping with thrift store browsing

Even though interaction designers deal primarily in pictures, ultimately we must rely on a strong vocabulary to explain experiences as we have intended them.